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20121201
20121231
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. more than 30,000 homes and busi re still without po michelle miller >> there's the water line right here. >> reporter: this staten island home joe ingento shares with his wife and three children is still without heat. >> i can't afford to do these. i have no more money. i'm broke. >> reporter: ingento has run out of money to fix the boiler flooded out by sandy. he's still waiting for his insurance check. >> i have flood insurance, i have homeowners insurance, i'm fully ensured. >> reporter: and they've given you nothing? >> absolutely zero. >> reporter: 6,000 homes and 800 apartment complexes around new york are without heat. when we met suzette robinson in her brooklyn apartment the only heat she had was from her gas stove. she'd suffered 16 straight days in the cold. >> it was freezing in here. you could blow smoke out of your mouth. that's how cold it was. >> reporter: the severe damage and shortage of repairmen have created delays few expected would last this long. 6,700 buildings in new york city need major work to become habitable. 2,100 families are still in fema-paid hotel r
the verdict: not guilty. and michelle miller tells us the driver is a free man tonight. .> how do you find the >> hndant, guilty or not guilty? >> not guilty. t reporter: the bus driver wept veen he heard the verdict. ears ill williams could have faced 15 years in prison. hisas driving 32 people from a connecticut casino to new york's chinatown when his bus hit a guardrail, toppled, and was torn open by a signpost. williams claimed he'd been cut off by a tractor-trailer. investigators found no evidence of that. but they discovered williams averaged three hours of sleep in the days before the crash. they cited driver fatigue as the probable cause. florence wong's father don lee was killed in the crash. >> he had 15 lives that was under under his control and they're not here. he has to live with that with conscinscience. >> reporter: prosecutors called 55 witnesses but could not produce direct evidence that lack of sleep impaired williams' driving. iredr goelz is former director of the national transportation arfety board. >> i think a guilty verdict would have sent a very strong eporage to
sacred ground in america. and therein lies a tale told by michelle miller. >> reporter: morrill worcester has been running this wreath- making business in columbia falls, maine, for 42 years. back in 1992, worcester had a surplus of wreaths and a great idea about what to do with them. >> as a boy, i won a trip to washington. and one of the things that i saw was arlington national cemetery, and i just never forgot that. then when they had that wreaths left over, i said it would be nice if i could maybe place them on the graves of the veterans. >> reporter: so worcester headed to arlington national cemetery to lay 5,000 wreaths. >> the first 14 years, nobody really knew about it. and it was a family gift to the military that, you know, i said, we'll always do that, and we always have. >> reporter: in 2006 a pentagon photographer published a photo. donations poured in and the nonprofit, wreaths across america, was born. karen worcester is morrill's wife. >> it's not unusual to have the phone ring; and he would pick up the phone and they'd say, is this morrill worcester? and he would say, yes
. michelle miller brings us up to speed. >> reporter: a half-foot of snow caused whiteouts on roads across the texas panhandle. there were near-blizzard conditions at day break in amarillo. 250 miles east, just outside oklahoma city, a 21-vehicle pile-up on interstate 40 stopped traffic for five hours. 12 people were injured. one state over in missouri, salt trucks were busy preparing the roads for expected heavy snowfall. transportation officials mark sheldon warned holiday travelers. >> certainly, those roads are slick. if you don't have to get out, please don't get out. >> reporter: the storm system caused heavy snow in the midwest, brought heavy rains and wind to the south, and shrouded the city of atlanta in fog. at least two reported tornadoes touched down in the houston area. one man was killed when a toppled tree flattened his pickup truck. by mid-afternoon, nearly 70,000 people in the houston area were without power. meteorologist david bernard says it's only going to get worse. >> this is a wide-ranging storm, as far as impacts go. there's a tornado threat in the south all the wa
? michelle miller catches up with a woman from breezy point. >> reporter: you wanted to look and see. when we first met marie lopresti eight weeks ago, she was desperately searching for anything spared by the fire that burned her home to the ground. >> is that something there? >> reporter: the only thing she found in the rubble was a charred fragment of a wine and cheese plate. but she was happy to have it. >> thank you. thank you. i got go now. [ crying ] [ knocking ] >> reporter: we wanted to know what happened to lopresti. hi, marie! >> hello. >> reporter: we found her in brooklyn at a family home she used to rent out. it's a house now filled with gifts from family, friends, even strangers. >> these are all the people that sent me letters and money, $598. >> wow. >> reporter: lopresti has been overwhelmed by the generosity of people from across the country, who saw her story and reached out. >> they all send me e-mails and funny things for me it laugh. and they all ask about me. they call. that's my house in breezy. >> reporter: some have even sent photos of her old home and copies of pict
a school shooting the recording told them not to come to the school. of course, everyone did. michelle miller met some of them today. >> we just ran to the fire station and we didn't really even know what we were finding at the fire station, if it was children, if it was adults telling us when we could get our children. >> reporter: melissa makris was among hundreds of parents desperate to find their children. >> we went in and you just saw lots and lots of kids and crying and parents and you just search for your child's teacher, for your child's face and i heard "mommy, mommy." and there he was sitting there waiting for us. >> reporter: makris's ten-year-old son phillip was in the school gym when the shooting began. >> my son says that those teachers gathered them in a corner and kept them safe. >> reporter: so the teachers are the heroes of today? >> absolutely. they did -- i was a teacher before i became a mom and you always wonder are you going to do what you need to do to protect your kids and those teachers did. phillip describes being pushed in a corner and they kept them safe t
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6